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Crop and Soil Sciences

The Department of Crop and Soil Sciences at Washington State University serves the Land Grant tradition by offering nationally competitive undergraduate and graduate education programs, conducting fundamental and applied plant and soil research, and extending the science of our disciplines to serve the public.


CSS News & Updates

WSU Field Days Go Virtual

One of the highlights for most Extension professionals in agriculture is the opportunity to showcase the latest and greatest in field research at field days and interact with growers face-to-face. Unfortunately, “face-to-face” during these unusual times is something to be avoided, so many of us are finding alternative solutions to accomplish the land grant mission. In this case, it means that Washington State University (WSU) has moved its summer 2020 field days online. WSU and USDA-ARS researchers have been working with the division of Academic, Outreach and Innovation as well as the College of Agriculture, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences (CAHNRS) Communications at WSU to visit variety trials and research plots around the state in order to film and produce virtual “field days”.

Each “field day” or location will be posted as a playlist on the WSU CAHNRS YouTube channel and users can click on the topic(s) of interest. Videos will be housed on the WSU CAHNRS YouTube page with links placed on multiple websites including the WSU Wheat & Small Grains website. We will also send out notifications via the Small Grains Twitter and Facebook when the videos are posted. The Lind Field Day is posted and the Reardan/Wilke Farm and Dayton field days should be posted by July 4. The Pullman Field Day will be posted no later than July 10.

Tadd Wheeler Joins Agricultural Technology and Production Management Program

Teacher and scientist Tadd Wheeler is joining Washington State University’s Agricultural Technology and Production Management (AgTM) Program, helping prepare students for promising careers that blend technological know-how with modern agriculture.

Starting on July 15, Wheeler will serve as a teaching assistant professor, taking over from James Durfey, who is nearing retirement after 28 years with the program. Wheeler will transition to lead the program following Durfey’s retirement.

One of the largest undergraduate majors in WSU’s College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences, AgTM readies students for careers in precision agriculture, farming and forestry, nursery management, animal breeding, seed production, and food quality. AgTM combines physical and biological sciences with technology, mathematics, business, and practical subjects. Graduates are highly sought after, and leave the program prepared to own, operate, and manage their own business or serve private and government organizations.

2020 Field Day Abstracts

The 2020 Field Day Abstracts are now available online! To download your copy, please go to our Field Day Abstracts page.

Crop Scientist Cedric Habiyaremye Highlights Global Food Security Challenge Amid Pandemic

Cedric Habiyaremye, a research associate and alumnus with the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, shared challenges and opportunities facing international food security due to the COVID-19 pandemic, speaking with global news organizations this spring.

At WSU, Habiyaremye leads and facilitates research collaborations with farmers in Africa to find ways to improve crop diversity and nutrition.

In April, he was interviewed for the Forbes story, “COVID-19 Is Expected To Be A Key Driver Of Acute Food Insecurity,” examining how existing food crises will worsen, particularly for rural people in poorer countries.

Scientists Uncover Plant Protein’s Role in Cellular Architecture, Drought Survival

A team of Washington State University scientists discovered how a little-understood plant protein guides development of tiny cellular structures that regulate the flow of sap from roots to shoots, revealing a potential way to help crops survive in a changing climate.

Detailed earlier this year in the journal New Phytologist, researchers at WSU’s Institute of Biological Chemistry (IBC) teamed up with molecular biologists and crop scientists at WSU, Princeton University, and the Université Côte d’Azur to investigate a protein called MAP20.

MAP20 was believed to play a role in producing cellulose, a key component of cell walls, but its physiological function was a mystery. Investigating MAP20 using Brachypodium, a model grass related to wheat, IBC biologist Andrei Smertenko partnered with Karen Sanguinet, a molecular physiologist in WSU’s Department of Crop and Soil Sciences. They designed experiments testing the protein’s function using genetics, cellular structure analysis, cell biology and biochemistry.

Scientists Uncover Plant Protein’s Role in Cellular Architecture, Drought Survival

A team of Washington State University scientists discovered how a little-understood plant protein guides development of tiny cellular structures that regulate the flow of sap from roots to shoots, revealing a potential way to help crops survive in a changing climate.

New Doctoral Grad Researching ‘Black Box of Soil’

Growing up in China’s Henan province, Qiuping (Ellen) Peng was drawn to agriculture while watching her parents care for their beautiful garden and grow food crops.

“The soil seemed to have magic power to grow all kinds of plants,” said Peng, who graduated this May with a doctorate in soil science from Washington State University. “My parents’ relationship with the land taught me that if you treat your soil well and work hard, you’ll always harvest what you plant.”

Herbicide Resistance: Coming to a Farm Near You

Herbicide resistance is a problem that is quickly spreading throughout the wheat growing regions of the inland PNW. The newly created Herbicide Resistance Weeds Map, located on the Wheat and Small Grains website, lets you see the results of Dr. Ian Burke’s Herbicide Resistance Testing Program at WSU.

After opening the Herbicide Resistance Weeds Map, select a county to see what herbicide-resistant biotypes have been identified in that county. Select “See screening results” in the popup box to see the number of samples that tested positive for resistance to the various herbicide active ingredients. You can also click on the active ingredient name or weed species name to learn more about the active ingredient or weed species.

Soil Science Alumnus Isaac Madsen Chosen to Lead WSU Oilseed Research

Developing improved crops and practices for the Inland Northwest’s growing oilseed industry, alumnus and soil scientist Isaac Madsen is Washington State University’s new extension agronomist for the Washington Oilseed Cropping Systems program.

Hired Sept. 1, Madsen is based in Pullman, and leads WSU’s field-based testing program for oilseed crops, including canola, camelina, safflower, and sunflower. He will work alongside WSU scientists, Extension experts and Northwest growers to test and improve oilseed varieties and production methods that help diversify dryland farming in eastern Washington.

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WSU Ag Programs Highly Ranked in the World

US News and World Report places WSU at #36 for Best Global Universities for Agriculture Sciences. For more information, go to the US News list. QS World University Rankings for Agriculture and Forestry places WSU at #45 worldwide. For more information, go to the CS Worldwide list.


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