Gill Lab Press Releases

 

Researchers Discover New Wheat Gene

PULLMAN, WASHINGTON, U.S. — Researchers from Washington State University in Pullman, Washington, U.S., have discovered a new wheat gene that may be used for the transfer of valuable genes from other plants to wheat. (Read More)

 

Researcher Finds Gatekeeper Wheat Gene

Washington State University researcher Kulvinder Gill has found a key gene that will allow breeders to move traits from wild grass relatives into wheat varieties. Gill expects to focus on finding stripe rust and root disease resistance for wheat varieties. (Read More)

 

Wheat Gene Discovery Clears Way for Non-GMO Breeding

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have found “the most famous wheat gene,” a reproductive traffic cop of sorts that can be used to transfer valuable genes from other plants to wheat. (Read More)

 

Discovery Allows Robust Wheat Strains Without GMO Tinkering

Researchers identified a wheat gene that acts as a reproductive traffic cop and which can be used to transfer valuable genes from other plants to wheat, says Washington State University. The discovery “clears the way for breeders to develop wheat varieties with the disease- and pest-resistance of other grasses…while forgoing the cost, regulatory hurdles and controversy of genetically modified organisms, or GMOs,” says a WSU release. (Read More)

 

A New Process Could Allow for Highly Targeted Crosses Between the Domesticated Crop and its Wild Relatives

Jointed goatgrass is even worse than it sounds. Classified as a noxious weed in Washington state, it’s considered a threat to the state’s wheat industry, the fourth-largest in the U.S. As the regional Noxious Weed Control Board explains, the wild grass, which is a cousin of domesticated wheat, can hybridize with winter wheat, reducing yields. (Read More)

 

New Non-GMO ‘Super Wheat’

Seattle – Botanists have discovered a wheat gene that can be used as a vehicle to transfer key genes from other plants to wheat. The discovery will allow farmers to develop new robust wheat varieties without having to resort to GMO crops. (Read More)

 

Most Famous Wheat Gene’ Discovered, Clears Way for Non-GMO Breeding

Researchers have found ‘the most famous wheat gene,’ a reproductive traffic cop of sorts that can be used to transfer valuable genes from other plants to wheat. The discovery clears the way for breeders to develop wheat varieties with the disease- and pest-resistance traits of other grasses, using a legion of genetic tools that can reduce crop losses and pesticide use while foregoing the cost, regulatory hurdles and controversy of genetically modified organisms. (Read More)

 

Discovery Of The ‘Most Famous Wheat Gene’ Clears Way To Breed Better, Non-GMO Wheat

Washington State University researchers have found “the most famous wheat gene,” a reproductive traffic cop of sorts that can be used to transfer valuable genes from other plants to wheat. (Read More)

 

Wheat Gene Discovery Clears Way for Non-GMO Breeding

Washington State University researchers have found “the most famous wheat gene,” a reproductive traffic cop of sorts that can be used to transfer valuable genes from other plants to wheat. (Read More)

 

‘Most Famous Wheat Gene’ Found

Washington State University researchers have found “the most famous wheat gene,” a reproductive traffic cop of sorts that can be used to transfer valuable genes from other plants to wheat. (Read More)

 

WSU Researchers Find ‘Most Famous Wheat Gene’

PULLMAN, Wash.—Washington State University researchers have found “the most famous wheat gene,” a reproductive traffic cop of sorts that can be used to transfer valuable genes from other plants to wheat. (Read More)

 

Genetically Modified Wheat, Without the GMO Drama

Researchers have discovered “the most famous wheat gene,” a reproductive traffic cop of sorts that can be used to transfer valuable genes from other plants to wheat, which clears the way for wheat varieties with disease- and pest-resistance traits of other grasses. (Read More)

 

WSU Leads Development of Heat-Tolerant Grain

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University will lead a $16.2 million effort to develop wheat varieties that are better at tolerating the high temperatures found in most of the world’s growing regions – temperatures that are likely to increase with global warming. (Read More)

 

Better Wheat for a Warming Planet

PULLMAN, Wash.—Washington State University will lead a new effort to develop wheat varieties that are better at tolerating the high temperatures found in most of the world’s growing regions—temperatures that are likely to increase with global warming. The research will be supported by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) and the Directorate of Wheat Research (DWR), and is part of the U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative, Feed the Future. (Read More)

 

WSU Leads $16.2 Million Search for Heat Tolerant Wheat

Washington State University researcher Kulvinder Gill is leading a $16.2 million international effort to develop heat tolerant varieties of wheat. (Read More)

 

India, US to Launch Joint Research Collaboration on Wheat

WASHINGTON: India and the US will launch a multi-million dollar joint research collaboration to develop wheat varieties, which can tolerate high temperatures. (Read More)

 

Climate Change Threatens Agriculture, but Genomics Comes to Rescue

BANGALORE: Kulvinder Gill, professor of breeding and genetics at the Washington State University in the US, describes himself as a dreamer and an optimist. One of his dreams is to make sure food production does not decline over the next few decades, when increasing temperatures act on the yields of major crops. (Read More)

 

USAID

WASHINGTON, D.C.—President Obama today announced that Feed the Future, his signature global hunger and food security initiative, is delivering on his promise to reduce hunger and malnutrition through agricultural development. New data demonstrate that, thanks in part to Feed the Future and other U.S. Government efforts, stunting rates have declined in Ethiopia, Ghana, and parts of Kenya by between 9 and 33 percent in recent years, while areas in Uganda have seen a 16 percent drop in poverty. (Read More)

 

India, US to Team Up for Research on Wheat

Washington, April 9: India and the US will launch a multi-million dollar joint research collaboration to develop wheat varieties, which can tolerate high temperatures. (Read More)

 

WSU to Develop Heat-Proof Wheat

PULLMAN, Wash.— Expecting temperatures to increase with global warming, researchers at Washington State University will try to develop varieties of wheat that can better tolerate the heat. (Read More)

 

Grainy Season: Engineering Drought-Resistant Wheat

Last summer’s drought in Russia pushed wheat prices to their highest levels in years, and the fallout is a reminder of how much humanity depends on the rain. Now, scientists are searching for novel approaches to make wheat less vulnerable to drought. (Read More)

www india school sex com Weihnachten Sex im Frühling video ficken deutsche Fucking Thieves XXX Sexy Araber wird teuer gefickt spiele sex Interracial couple fucking
Hot teen with big tits getting fuck tamil sex Nikki Ford HD Porn Videos xxxbf xhamster hart gefickt porno nackt teen
porn sex videos xxx sex free porn xxx porn hd porn xnxx xxx sexy video xxx tube malay porn xxxhd xxx india